Thursday, December 29, 2005

A Change In Attitude?

North County Times article by Adam Kaye

ENCINITAS ---- City officials have struck a first-of-its-kind deal with two Encinitas homeowners. The homeowners, Anthony and Erin Smith, are getting nearly a 50 percent break on their property taxes. In exchange, they have agreed not to raze or substantially alter their historic home at 221 Sunset Drive.

The City Council this month unanimously approved Encinitas' first "Mills Act" tax-incentive agreement with the Smiths. The Legislature enacted the Mills Act in 1972, and in 2003, the City Council adopted the program to preserve local landmarks.

To qualify for tax relief, the Smiths have agreed to preserve the appearance of their 1926 English Tudor-style home and to allow periodic inspections by city officials.


This too late for the old adobe church compound that used to exist at Vulcan and F but I like it. Southern California has been infected with a strange desire to tear down everything in it's short history, I'm glad some people are now stopping to take a deep breath and saying no to the bulldozer.

6 comments:

  1. Save Community CharacterDecember 29, 2005 9:04 PM

    Yes, St. John's Church was demolished, although it definitely had historical significance. This happened so that a small tract of two story homes could be built, taking away a little more open space, too. This was under the City's purview, too, as the homes were built after 91, and the City Incorporated in 86.

    Now many wish we could save St. Mark's, near Scripps Hospital, just off of Santa Fe. The stained glass is beautiful. The City apparently values parking lots more than charm, or historical value. And what about the increased run off from paving more open space?

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  2. Protect and PreserveDecember 29, 2005 9:17 PM

    I'm glad the homeowners saved this home, and get the tax breaks, but their intention is to sell.

    Wish more people would buy their homes to actually live here, not to turn them over for big profits. Yes, we all have the right to profit.

    But we also have the right to live here, show true compassion for the community, too. We can cherish and protect our community character, being a good neighbor.

    By the way, City was supposed to instigate this type of historical preservation practice long ago, according to the North Coast 101 Corridor Plan, available online.

    Glad this is beginning to happen. Don't think they'll give our little beach shack a tax break, though. And why would most people want all the City inspections? Might make the place harder to sell. For Community Character, the main concern should be the outside of the home, as viewed from public right of way. Inside should be private. New owners might not want to honor the "covenants," requiring City to nose about. And new owners on low income affordable housing are not required to honor those previous covenants, according to Council.

    Wish for a new day. But it's not here, yet. For a new year's resolution, let's vow to vote out bad incumbents. Out with the old, in with the new. We should have term limits of 8 years for Council members so we can get some honest folks, not in there for social status, political ambitions at State level, financial gain, or all three.

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  3. Hapy New Year, happy moment.

    Peace, balance, harmony. May we all me empowered by love, spirit of reconciliation.

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  4. Happy New Year's Eve, everybody,
    be happy right now

    thanks to all for caring,
    sharing in community.

    Yes, we can cherish our individual differences, and our homes, tradition, and creativity, by protecting and preserving our community character.

    Save our family homes!

    We celebrate, with you, our compassion, ability to share, relishing all of our individual rights, too.

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  5. The same motives behind preservation, namely the belief that you should be able to tell others what they can or can't do with their property, will also be the motives that ultimately drive business like Channins out of Encinitas. It's a double-edged sword when one doesn't have ultimate respect for property rights.

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  6. Dear Stupor,

    The historic designation is voluntary. The people get a tax break. Why is this bad? No one is telling them what to do with their property. They are signing a contract to leave it the same in exchange for a tax break. They probably like the looks so they are getting a tax break for soemthing they were going to do anyway.

    ReplyDelete

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