Tuesday, January 22, 2008

L101 Trees 2003



From the files of Fred Caldwell.


As you can see, these trees are now gone.

20 comments:

  1. That second picture give me serious wood!

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  2. Just put a picture of a huge turd on the blog... thats what leucadia looks like now.

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  3. Tired Of Waiting!!January 22, 2008 10:02 PM

    Yeah, yeah, yeah, TRESS we get it!! You want trees for Leucadia!! Let me ask a simple question, if the city can't water and maintain properly the friggin flowers in the median of 101, how are they expected to maintain trees??

    But a more important issue is the extremely long wait to cross 101 in the late afternoon, today I waited 4 minutes to cross from Leucadia blvd east bound to the 7-11.Four minutes stuck in traffic going no where.

    Sell the Hall property and use the money to improve and fix this problem!

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  4. Show up tomorrow at the city council "goal" meeting and voice your opinions. The city determines the validity of an issue by how many people show up, not on the merits. So those who truly want to do something about saving the tree canopy, get to the meeting and voice your opinions! If you can't stay until the agenda item is called, show up at 6:00 p.m. and make your comments during the open communication time. I will be there, hope to see you.

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  5. Bonddi and All-

    vote Ron Paul!!!

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  6. Tonight.
    Goal setting for the city.
    Make your voices heard.
    Help make Leucadia better.
    Let the council see some new faces and hear new voices.
    You can make a difference.

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  7. The trees are being cut down to make way for 101 realignment and redevelopment of Leucadia. Jerome Stocks is behind this. Norby is the 101 coordinator, lets get him to coordinate a response and save old Leucadia. If he won't IMMEDIATELY, with no foot dragging delay tactics, do this we will know who's team he is on.

    It is not like Leucadia hasn't been duped before!

    Don't let Jerome turn Leucadia into Irvine.

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  8. I agree with Wake Up! Show up tonight, get your neighbors to show up, put something in writing and email or mail it to the Council. SAVE OUR CITY!

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  9. Who's the babe trying to pull the tree out of the ground?

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  10. Re/ 3:30 My tree hugging soul mate. (And if nobody says anything, she will never kill me after finding out she's famous now! Shhhhh)

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  11. Fred, you leacher. If thats your woman then what in the hell are you doing blogging at such ungodly late hours ie..1:30 a.m. ?

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  12. We had vowed to marry if we didn't find anyone better within 2 years. When 2 years passed and we still hadn't found anyone else, we changed our minds. But, life's long.

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  13. i believe the last friday in april is arbor day. i have torreys and some other suitable material that i will provide free if someone is willing to undertake planting them. if a few hundred are planted and if there is no water service some are going to survive, which is better than what you have now. some may be watered by merchants some by citizens some by night denziens like RSPB. i'll drop them off if there is a someone willing to plant them.

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  14. You rule Gil. Count me in for 10. 760 942-2346 (unless they're 30' tall of course). 760 942-2346

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  15. I spoke with Kristin Thomas who is the environmental project planner for nctd she informed me that she was working with L101 to come up with a replanting program. She also informed me only CA natives would be used I then asked about Torrey Pines and was told no we want low maintenance trees or plants and Torrey Pines aren't on the list. Then she said Oleanders weren't her favorite but there doing well on the HWY. Oleanders are from northern Africa and southeast Asia. My impression was she wasn't concerned with the appearance of the HWY and was tried of my questions and told me I was trespassing and went back to supervising the chopping of the trees.
    Gil I'm with Fred I'll gladly dig holes and plant trees.

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  16. (Sorry for the long, rambling post folks. I'll try harder in the future. I blame 1eyedmike.)

    Let me get this straight Mr. 1eyedmike: The NCTD environmental planner told you she only wanted trees that are native and don't require maintenance, yet she would support planting more Oleanders on their right of way? Hmmmm.

    #1. Oleanders are incapable of making a canopy and they're not trees.
    #2. Oleanders are not indigenous and highly poisonous.
    #3. Oleanders require TONS of maintenance to keep them from being what they are: a bush.
    #4. Torrey Pines require little maintenance. What native tree requires less? I'll call to get the list she spoke of.
    But being told you were trespassing is the chimney on the roof of your story. Guess that’s nicer than “Talk to the hand!”

    But to water down what I just said (no pun) I like the Oleanders too! They're awesome in bloom (which lasts several months) and create a sound buffer between locomotives and humans. I know the city is not fond of them because of the maintenance they require, but that's what the chain gangs are for, and there's no shortage of those with our stealthy redlight cams.

    I'm not convinced planting only natives to make California what it once was: "a vast wasteland" is best for the environment or ambiance of Leucadia. They are not doing well in 6 medians we planted 3 years ago yet (costing investors $7 thousand and one hard working planner a lot of his time.) Even the last time the city planted natives in the medians (after LTC was successful with poppies) they all died. The natives are not restless, they're lifeless. We live in a scorched, fire-prone desert, but even Nebuchadnezzar managed to nurture his hood a few thousand years ago with 4 acres of lush gardens (75 feet in the air. Imagine that!) What's wrong with us? Better yet, where did Neb go wrong? Design by committee?

    Lastly, I think it's noteworthy that the city has replanted several Eucalyptuses in recent years in the medians. Surprise. I'm glad they have, and I'm all for a third of the trees for future planting being those again. They’ll replenish the shade we enjoy before any other tree can.

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  17. Meanwhile, 500 million gallons of fresh distilled rainwater just got dirty and went into the ocean.

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  18. Leucadia first....January 27, 2008 9:00 AM

    Fred- use caution!! Calling for the planting of non-native species of trees and flowers will have you crossing swords with Leucadia Icon "BOB".

    The cities failure to water the flowers in the medians is criminal. Many years ago the barber at The Buzz would water the plants he planted late into the night. Keeping alive a small patch of green opposite his shop. The only patch of green on H101 at that time.

    H101 medians need flowers of all colors, native or not. Leucadia should adopt the discarded flowers from Cottonwood Creek park and replant them in the center medians. If color is good for Cottonwood Creek Park it's good for Leucadia!!

    Leucadia first, last and always!!

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  19. I'm with you Fred I'd like to see Eucalyptuses planted again their fast growing thou net native they have been growing in CA longer than any of us still living. I've been from Vista to Santee in the last couple of days while driving I was making note of all the Eucalyptuses growing along the freeways and on ramps and off ramps where if a branch or tree fell a person or car could be hit. I mention this because one of NCTD's concerns was the danger factor as the need to prune to the ground. I think it's safe to say if they can be planted along roadways through out the county and all cross CA they should be fine replanted where they used to be. Let's hope the Hwy 101 czar can make this point.

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  20. If someone is approaching caltrans about plantings here is what i could easily supply:

    100 Agonis flexuosa “peppermint willow”
    50 Bauhinia galpinii “red bauhinia” shrub-like
    50 Brachychiton rupestus “Queensland Bottle tree”
    50 Cassia leptophylla “Gold medallion tree”
    50 Chamaerops humilis “Mediterranean Fan palm”
    50 Cupressus sempervirens pyramidalis “Calif. Variety”
    50 Eucalyptus gunni “Cider Gum”
    75 Geijera parviflora “Australian willow”
    100 Hesperaloe parviflora “Red Yucca”
    100 Leptosperum scoparium “New Zealand Tea tree”
    50 Metrosiderous tomentosa “New Zealand Christmas tree”
    100 Phormium tenex “atropurpurea” and green
    50 Pinus canariensis “Canary Island Pine”
    50 Pinus eldarica “Afghan Pine” (best desert pine)
    100 Pinus torreyana “Torrey pine”
    100 Pittosporum tennuifolium “Nigrans” (good fast tight prune-able screening shrub/tree
    75 Rhus lancea “African sumac”
    50 Tracycarpus fortunii “Windmill palm”
    50 Washingtonia filifera Calif. Palm”

    All of this material is in “Anderson tree band” pots( 2-7/8" square X 5 ½“ deep). The holes to plant them would only need to be about 16" deep and 10-12" wide. The plants range in size from about 12' tall to 48" tall. They are not large plants. i do not have a lot of material that is instant gratification size. Folks would have to be satisfied with planting for the future. As Thomas
    Fuller said - “Those that plant a tree love others besides themselves.”

    i do have other material but this list has the plants that are the most drought tolerant, relatively
    durable, and relatively well behaved. Now they are NOT all Cal natives Bob. They all do well
    in California.

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