Monday, February 25, 2008

Turning Left on the L101,



...is not fun!

15 comments:

  1. Tell me about it. Bikers, speeders from the left, pedestrians from the right. Frequently liquor trucks or big SUVs blocking your vision.
    Its actually amazing more accidents/injuries don't happen. If there is going to be more pedestrians, more cars parking, more people coming in and out the speed on 101 is going to have to be slowed down; the sight lines more opened up. Some serious planning needs to happen.

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  2. love that huge liquor sign. it should blink vegas style. you wont find that just anywhere.

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  3. I agree, that is a sketchy corner to make a left from.

    I also love that sign! But back in the 50's it was even better, as it had "Art Googie" fonts in the squares that were orange letters with black outlines on a turquoise background. Far funkier than the stark black Arial Black on white it is now.

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  4. Even right turns are dangerous on 101 when the pass through traffic is hauling ass on their way to somewhere else.

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  5. Isn't L101 the name of our Mainstreet
    Association, not the name of Hwy 101?

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  6. Just pulling out on to Hwy101 is a hair ball experience.

    I think Council should seriously consider accelerating the schedule for constructing the streetscape along N.C. Hwy 101 from 20 years down to 5 years. I think it’s a high priority to keep its residents safe, increase business revenues and tax revenues, and increase the quality of life for all that live, visit or pass through N. Coast Hwy 101. This seems like a no brainer to me and much higher priority than anymore trophy projects that may be really nice expensive building that does little to improve the overall atmosphere for all Encinitas residents. Normally trophy buildings cost a ton to build and maintain and serve a very small portion of the public. Streetscape serves a very large percentage of our residents.

    Let’s get the streetscape built quickly from Encinitas Blvd all the way up to La Costa Avenue as soon as possible and we will improve the City's health and reduce the accidents and fatalities.

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  7. Yes.
    We need to do all we can to fast track this long overdue improvement.
    Don't let the city put us on the back burner again.
    Public safety has to take priority over any regional 'special use' sports park.
    Our time has come.

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  8. Now if someone would run on the issues of fast tracking the HWY101 improvements, separating the council and the SDWD, revisiting the trophy firehouse projects and considering moderating the Hall Sports Park, wow. What a ticket.

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  9. anon 6:19 I just scoured through the Leucadia 101 Mainstreet Association website and the term L101 does not appear anywhere. I think you mean L101MSA.

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  10. I wholeheartedly support the idea of fast tracking the Hwy101 improvements. The longer the city waits the more expensive the project becomes, and the less likely it will be accomplished.

    I also support the immediate separation of Encinitas City Council and the San Dieguito Water District. They should be independently elected governing bodies.

    Issues surrounding the Hall Property should be addressed in a day long community workshop. There is no reason a community park, not a regional sports facility, can not be developed with the blessings of the impacted neighbors, sooner rather than later.

    I also believe each fire station renovation should be planned independently, and renovated as finances permit.

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  11. No left turns should be permitted on H101 from the west side of H101. All turns should be right hand turns(Even those are dangerous, try turning right at Diana street some morning, they need to extend that red zone in front of Corner Frame shop another 50 feet) and then go south 1 block to a U turn area to go north on H101. Simple solution to a difficult problem!!

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  12. As for the L101 name confussion:
    Over four years ago our Mainstreet Association came up with the term 'L101' in order not to be called LEMA, as in DEMA. They have been using this name that they created openly and notoriously since inception. Any L101 board member will confirm this fact.
    Of course, anyone can call anything anything, but it was coined years ago by our mainstreet association and C101 will be the name of the soon to be formed Cardiff Mainstreet.

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  13. Good suggestions, Bob.

    That is a dangerous corner. I also hope that the streetscape for the North Coast Hwy 101 Corridor can be accelerated.

    The most challenging aspect will be finding the funding in the City's budget, in my opinion.

    And yes, Bob, the SDWD and the City should have more separation. In general, our City does not have checks and balances because Council is ultimately the executive, legislative and judicial branches, all rolled into one, including those functions within the San Dieguito Water District.

    The Commissions do offer some separation, but the commissioners are "political" appointees, too.

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  14. Lucky to live in CardiffFebruary 26, 2008 5:37 PM

    Holly Crap.

    If Fat Carlsbox can't afford a Sports Park, and the long term sucking sound of operational deficit, why the hell are we ( a small town half the size) looking to fund a regional sports park?

    This issue and the Ritz fire stations have to float to the top for our November elections. The park issue needs to go to the public vote. Jerome Stocks is a major supporter to both of these projects and has some "es-plaining to do". This election is going to be FUN!!!

    These projects along with the recent pensions benefit increases are going to bankrupt our city.

    You can kiss your streetscape goodbye Leucadia. The City will be lucky if they can afford to by one tree. And there not going to plant it in Leucadia. Haaa Haa Haaa.... You will definately be staying "funky and junky" for many years to come. I'm glad you like it that way

    See below article.

    http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/northcounty/20080223-9999-1mc23alga.html

    "Slated for 32 acres at Poinsettia Lane and Alicante Road, the proposed park includes three half-court basketball courts, three lighted baseball fields, skate and dog parks, a playground, concessions, restrooms, picnic tables and green space.

    The city has one pool, at Carlsbad High School, that doubles as a municipal and school facility.

    Residents have clamored for a second pool for years, and plans for the swim complex call for a 55-meter, Olympic-size pool, a 12-lane instruction pool, a therapy pool, slides, wet play structures and a circulating “lazy river.” It also would include a mechanical building to make everything work.

    The park would cost $17 million, while the swim complex is estimated at $21.4 million. Construction management, contingency, utilities, furnishings and other items would bump the total to $50.4 million.

    The project has been increasing at roughly a $10 million-a-year pace over the past two years: in 2005-06 it was estimated at $30.5 million, and in 2006-07 it hit $39.2 million. Rising construction costs and plan refinements contributed to the increase.

    “When all this stuff started way back when, the economy was really good,” Mayor Bud Lewis said. “Things have changed.

    “The economy has gone south, there's heavy debt on the state and federal level,” Lewis said, which may mean raids on funding to cities.

    Moreover, the mayor said, Carlsbad just appropriated $24 million for a joint police-fire training facility, which was twice a previous estimate.

    Packard and Councilman Matt Hall voted against the full pool project last year, and now Lewis has joined them in asking to pare it down and build it in phases.

    The big target is the “lazy river,” which could save $2 million to $5.8 million in construction costs if eliminated.

    “I think there's not been a demand for it,” Packard said. “I'm not advocating that it ever be built at all.

    “The instructional pool and competition pool – citizens have expressed an interest, so that's a financially viable prospect,” Packard said. “The therapy pool – I've not been convinced there's an outcry for that.”

    The 55-meter competition pool, estimated at $2.8 million to $6.6 million, is the cornerstone of the project, said Lisa Rodman, one of the aquatic center's leading advocates.

    “Having the pools built is the Number One priority,” said Rodman, who is also a Carlsbad Unified School District trustee.

    “This (55-meter pool) will be at capacity opening day; that's how short water is” in North County, Rodman said.

    The next logical component to build is the 12-lane pool, she said, because that's where the teaching takes place.

    The city solicited bids on the entire project last year and rejected the low bid of $29.3 million – $9 million less than the estimate – because it failed to meet all the requirements.

    Skip Hammann, the city's special projects director, said building the project in phases may not be as economical as it sounds.

    “The way the park's designed, everything's integrated,” he said. “There's one mechanical building that has all the pumps, all the controls, all the chlorine. Each one of the pool components are not stand-alone.”

    He said pool technology advances every year, so the city probably wouldn't want to use an old system as a base if it decided to expand it five or 10 years later. He said that could increase operating costs, estimated at $2.1 million, with revenues of $1.5 million.

    Hammann said that if the council proceeds with the project as is, it could go back out to bid next week. If it decides to pare it down, it would take nine months to a year to redesign, he said.

    Slated for 32 acres at Poinsettia Lane and Alicante Road, the proposed park includes three half-court basketball courts, three lighted baseball fields, skate and dog parks, a playground, concessions, restrooms, picnic tables and green space.

    The city has one pool, at Carlsbad High School, that doubles as a municipal and school facility.


    Residents have clamored for a second pool for years, and plans for the swim complex call for a 55-meter, Olympic-size pool, a 12-lane instruction pool, a therapy pool, slides, wet play structures and a circulating “lazy river.” It also would include a mechanical building to make everything work.

    The park would cost $17 million, while the swim complex is estimated at $21.4 million. Construction management, contingency, utilities, furnishings and other items would bump the total to $50.4 million.

    The project has been increasing at roughly a $10 million-a-year pace over the past two years: in 2005-06 it was estimated at $30.5 million, and in 2006-07 it hit $39.2 million. Rising construction costs and plan refinements contributed to the increase.

    “When all this stuff started way back when, the economy was really good,” Mayor Bud Lewis said. “Things have changed.

    “The economy has gone south, there's heavy debt on the state and federal level,” Lewis said, which may mean raids on funding to cities.

    Moreover, the mayor said, Carlsbad just appropriated $24 million for a joint police-fire training facility, which was twice a previous estimate.

    Packard and Councilman Matt Hall voted against the full pool project last year, and now Lewis has joined them in asking to pare it down and build it in phases.

    The big target is the “lazy river,” which could save $2 million to $5.8 million in construction costs if eliminated.

    “I think there's not been a demand for it,” Packard said. “I'm not advocating that it ever be built at all.

    “The instructional pool and competition pool – citizens have expressed an interest, so that's a financially viable prospect,” Packard said. “The therapy pool – I've not been convinced there's an outcry for that.”

    The 55-meter competition pool, estimated at $2.8 million to $6.6 million, is the cornerstone of the project, said Lisa Rodman, one of the aquatic center's leading advocates.

    “Having the pools built is the Number One priority,” said Rodman, who is also a Carlsbad Unified School District trustee.

    “This (55-meter pool) will be at capacity opening day; that's how short water is” in North County, Rodman said.

    The next logical component to build is the 12-lane pool, she said, because that's where the teaching takes place.

    The city solicited bids on the entire project last year and rejected the low bid of $29.3 million – $9 million less than the estimate – because it failed to meet all the requirements.

    Skip Hammann, the city's special projects director, said building the project in phases may not be as economical as it sounds.

    “The way the park's designed, everything's integrated,” he said. “There's one mechanical building that has all the pumps, all the controls, all the chlorine. Each one of the pool components are not stand-alone.”

    He said pool technology advances every year, so the city probably wouldn't want to use an old system as a base if it decided to expand it five or 10 years later. He said that could increase operating costs, estimated at $2.1 million, with revenues of $1.5 million.

    Hammann said that if the council proceeds with the project as is, it could go back out to bid next week. If it decides to pare it down, it would take nine months to a year to redesign, he said.

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  15. Separating the SDWD from the Encinitas City Council is a formidable task, as I found out when attempting to even bring it up to Council. I heard just about every excuse I could imagine. Each City Council member gets $100.00 per meeting, up to 10 meetings a month for being on the SDWD. I don't know if this is a part of the problem, or exactly what it is. I get a different answer, depending on who I talk to. I would also love to see it separated, however, I have run out of what I thought were creative ideas when I approached them. Whoever,or whatever group, that can make this happen, I say KUDOS.

    ReplyDelete

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