Sunday, November 23, 2008

Got Heroin?


It is cool that the Coast News ran a feature on heroin use in Encinitas. It finally puts some light on an issue that has been festering. For years, heroin dealers have openly taken up shop in the downtown/moonlight beach area. Merchants know about it, surfers know about it, high school students know about it and tourists could figure it out.

Even with the easy access to the drug, there is no rampant heroin epidemic in Encinitas among our youth. One percent of local high school students report lifetime use of heroin (5% at Sunset H.S.).


From The Coast News article:

Joan and Tim Smith are baffled as to how their child’s former dealer, among others, can still sell drugs openly in the D Street corridor of Encinitas...

Detective Johnson said because the Encinitas station only has two detectives for their department’s jurisdiction — which encompasses Encinitas, Del Mar, Solana Beach, Cardiff-by-the-Sea and Rancho Santa Fe — he and his partner are sometimes restricted to how quickly they can respond to citizens’ reports.

“We have limited time and ability to take care of things as fast as people want,” Johnson said. “If it was in my backyard, I’d want it done tomorrow, but it doesn’t work that way in our job. There are too many legal hoops we have to go through.”

I’ve heard the sheriffs have stepped up patrols, and my observations seem to indicate that things have cleaned up. I hadn’t realized that the dealers still have a presence.

Our town is becoming more urbanized and our town is less and less dominated by young college educated families with two kids and a dog. We are also increasing our population size and density. I’d like to see the City of Encinitas review and update its law enforcement policies so that we always have more than enough law enforcement officers to saturate any problems when they begin to arise and not after they get established.

24 comments:

  1. I don't know about heroin specifically, but there's a fair amount of drugs sold outside the 7-Eleven at the corner of Mountain Vista and Village Park Way, too.

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  2. Back when I was a kid there was just scrub and trails out where village park is. I use to hunt squirrels and catch lizards.

    This drug thing is just something a few whiners are complaining about.

    I did a lot of drugs back and there is nothing wrong with that.

    We have the greatest police officers in all of California.

    Now let me tell you about this great sports park that I am going to build for the kiddos.

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  3. The lowlife scumbag drug dealers have been hanging out on the D-St stairs for years harrassing everyone who walks past but the Encinitas Sheriff department is too busy pulling me over for a busted tail light to do anything about it.

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  4. 11:16

    That's some impersonation! Can you do Sarah Palin?

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  5. When I am King I willNovember 23, 2008 2:12 PM

    Legalize drugs period.... they are easy to get anywhere at any time. People need to learn the world is dangerous and they are responsible for not pumping or smoking gasoline.

    Legalize drugs, tax them and clear out 75% of the prison problem.

    Kill all the killers NOW and make room for the forthcoming burglars from the coming depression.

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  6. Well, I didn't know about the Heroin problem in Encinitas. I'm 19, a SDA graduate and I used drugs in HS.

    Heroin isn't the problem. Pills are the problem. Xanax, percocet, oxycotin...etc.

    Encinitas kids are too rich to mess around with dirty heroin. They would rather get a pill from a pharmacy and take it.

    Trust me, pill abuse in Encinitas is HUGE. Parents are SO oblivious, it's sad but also funny (in a sick way) at the same time.

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  7. Dear King,

    I'm with you on the legalization all drugs. We live in a country where Alcohol and Tobacco are legal and by far cause more problems than all illegal drugs combined. Is that a hypocritical, double standard we maintain or what?

    And yes, legal or not, of course all drug misuse works contrary to a healthy environment and is many times fatal if not permanently debilitating.

    And true, that would clear out 75% of the prison population. (Each prisoners cost taxpayers at least $30 grand per year). And I'd even be with you on the "kill all killers" (being the stabbing victim of a theif). But in 1995 I didn't know how crooked a Carlsbad PD Officer was and the awesome power at his disposal. He got my sister convicted of a murder she had NOTHING to do with. That soured our family and many we know on capital punishment for sure.


    Going to San Dieguto HS when it had the highest drug use per capita in Calif in the early 70's, I happened to never do drugs. Hey, Lucky me, I've always had good friends. But my little sister got in the wrong crowd and caved to peer pressure. With her bad associations it eventually turned to (the light but frequent) use of smoking meth in cigarettes. She finally escaped an habitual felon and abusive husband who not only beat her but kept her into meth. In Aug of '91, Cheri went to Texas to get away from him and the local drug scene. It worked. She immediately got off meth, got a good job and her life completely changed for the better. At least until late 1993 when a cop decided to pin a murder on an easy target: "A meth addict". Long story short, with junk forensics, a covered up alibi, and outright lying by the prosecution, Cheri is now spending 26 to life in prison for an "axe murder" she didn't do. She's now the poster child for JUST SAY NO TO DRUGS. Her former associations painted a grim picture of her character at her trial, and now flat out tells teenagers who visit her in prison in the "Scared Straight" program that although she is innocent, her former bad associations sealed her prison sentence that most likely means life in prison for her.
    (Forget that the prosecutor offered her 6 years for a guilty plea pre-trial. What innocent person in their right mind would accept that?)

    We are taught from a young age to trust Police and cooperate with them. But they are trained to decieve not only suspects but anyone else they may interview. They are not trained to falsify forensic evidence, but that's what they did to Cheri Dale. Type her name into Youtube.com and learn how one local wrongful conviction occured. It can happen to almost anyone.

    If someone wants to do drugs, whether they are legal or not is of no consequence to them. Those who want to, will. Those who are smart, stay away - . Those who want to recover, hopefully can.

    I'm not at all saying legalize crime. People will still be accountable for problems they cause, "due to drugs" or not.

    Sorry to ramble and bring this up again for those of you who already know. But you knew this thread was dangerous when you clicked on it.

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  8. The Encinitas Sheriff department is legendary for sloppy police work but holy shit Fred that story is scary.

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  9. Fred, that story is awful. It must be hard to even share it. Thanks. I just read about a man in the east who has been imprisoned for more than 25 years. Prisons must be emptied. It has become a profit center and it is twisted.

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  10. That should have read "innocent man" imprisoned . . .

    I am sure there are thousands and thousands.

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  11. We have plenty of Sheriff's deputies here. The problem is their deployment. Everyone at the station house is transient. None of them live here. They can't afford it on the salaries they are paid.

    It is time for this city to form their own Police department and let people work their whole careers in our city. Then they can recognize and deal with long term problems like heroin dealers.

    The deputies have no "ownership" to our community. The problem we have is who supported our council members during their elections. If they were supported by the deputies they are not about to study getting rid of them. They are politically beholden to them like the developers.

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  12. Two detectives is not enough.

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  13. Dear Fred:
    Is there anything we can do to help your sister? This is an all too common tragedy, and it occurs with frequency in all States of this Country. Let us know if there is anything that might help.

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  14. 7:34-

    There is no way we can afford our own Police Department.

    Quite talking like an idiot.

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  15. Be Careful Out ThereNovember 24, 2008 10:05 AM

    There have also been a number of "hot prowl" robberies in the last few months in Cardiff, New Encinitas and Encinitas Highlands.

    Hot prowls are when the bad guys break into houses when the people are home...usually early in the morning.

    Anonymous 7:34am is right. The sheriffs have no ownership to this community.

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  16. Dr.Lorri-Welcome back, you have been missed.
    Happy Thanksgiving to you also.
    RSPB

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  17. Everyone knows that there is no crime in Encinitas.

    Two deputies are too many.

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  18. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  19. Anon 4:24 is right about the use patterns of our high school students. Opiate based prescription painkillers are commonly used by high school students.

    Last year 15% of local high school students admitted using painkillers to get high more than one time. That is balanced by a large proportion of students without any lifetime use of alcohol (26%) or marijuana (48%).

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  20. I'm friends with deputy sheriffs and they act like they are serving their hometown, however deputies get moved around the county so they aren't always here.

    anon 8:14,

    We pay for a police service now. How much money is saved by using a contract service? How large of a city do you need to be before it is better to have your own force?

    Is a city the size of Del Mar + Solana Beach + Encinitas combined big enough?

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  21. 5:24

    Actually, it was mostly the Carlsbad PD supplying the false information. But the San Diego County Sheriff's Crime Lab was worse than sloppy. They were flat out wrong, but had sworn they were right. One "Criminalist" determined through his microscopic examination of "Hair from the hand of the victim" concluded that it was NOT the murder victim's own hair in her hand. That result opened the door to test several suspect's hair, including Cheri's. The next step was Detective Wick (deceased) falsifying the next test result done at the Sheriff's dept. Wick swore in Cheri's arrest warrant that the hairs in the hand were "similar in all respect" to Cheri's hair. Add in a PARTIAL DNA test from Cellmark Diagnostics in Maryland that narrowed the probability it was Cheri's hair down to 50 million people and bingo, they had enough "probable cause" to arrest Cheri for this murder. Then the DNA whiz under oath at the grand jury swore Cheri: "Cannot be excluded as the source of the DNA from the hair in the hand of the victim" and bingo, Cheri was indicted (not requiring a preliminary hearing). But get this, only 30 days later the Cellmark DNA expert Paula Yates came to a new conclusion on the same hair samples and stated Cheri "IS excluded as the source of the DNA of the hair in the victim's hand." In fact, the prosecutor then claimed the victim's own hair was in her hand. (Proving the initial forensic result by the Sheriff's Dept. was void.)
    When it came time for the defense to expose these incredibly false forensics at trial and the damage they had already done to Cheri, instead her court appointed trial attorney said "No questions your Honor" when he could have had a field day with the "forensic experts". The misleading DNA tests and the falsified hair test results were all covered up. - the driving reasons she arrested, indicted and was at trial.
    Scary story? You bet. It's a living Twilight Zone nightmare only it's real.

    6:21
    Actually, it's easy to share this story. Our family has volumes of letters we've written the big wigs - to no avail. Not to mention the time and money to date that we've exausted trying to get justice.
    Police lied about possessing one important article of evidence that COULD be DNA tested. We approached the Innocence Project to have them acquire the sample and do a DNA test on it. We even offered to pay for the test. After they considered it for a year, they refused to test it and stone-walled us.

    Prior to trial Cheri took a lie detector test and passed it. That led the prosecutor to offer her a sodium pendethal (truth serum) test. But when she eagerly jumped at their offer, they withdrew it, rationalizing that "she'd probably fake that result too" or so they said.

    8:25 Dr. Lorri,

    Thanks for your concern and desire to help. One of the terrible things about this case is that no one has been able to do anything so far to free Cheri. In the beginning there was hope. A few months after her arrest, her former attorney exposed the false forensics the arresting officer swore was true in her arrest warrant. It infuriated Judge Charles Rogers so much, he released Cheri on her Own Recognizance until he could make a ruling on the defense's claims of Perjury, Falsified Evidence and Outrageous Governmental Misconduct. It was the only O.R. the judge had done for a murder suspect in his 20 year career and he repeatedly said "I do not do this lightly".
    Cheri was out for a year on O.R. working two jobs and drug free for 3 years at that time. We never dreamed the case would go to trial, it was ridiculous. But the prosecutor got his Grand Jury indictment on 5-20-94 and that SUBVERTED the Preliminary Hearing we were all looking forward to where many suspected Judge Rogers would throw the case out for lack of evidence. Everything went downhill from then on. Cheri's champion attorney Steven Wadler was REMOVED as her lawyer with an alleged "conflict of interest". Then Judge Rogers retired. A series of Judges ensued, and at every hearing the prosecutor attempted to re-incarcerate Cheri. Judge Gill finally did that before her trial.
    I'm rambling again sorry. But if I get any new ideas to remedy this miscarriage of justice, I'll let everyone know! Appreciate suggestions, but we've usually been there and done those, locally and abroad.

    There is still hope! I'm one of those idealists that still believes truth sets people free.

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  22. Dear Fred:
    If you have an e-mail address, or phone number, could you let me know what it is so I don't have to use the blog for my message to you? My e-mail is lgreene98@aol.com. I was wondering if you ever sought the help of either the ACLU or Calaware for your sister. Your story is so compelling and heartbreaking. I can't get it out of my mind. I am sure I could offer nothing that you have not checked on, but if you drop me a line, I did think of a few ideas that I would like to share with you.
    With love,
    Dr. Lorri

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  23. David Dallager was a nut, crazy as a shit house rat, his brother Lucas is good at surfing but is a punk bitch with typical north county im better than you ill kick your ass tough guy bro attitude. Whole family is a little off now that i think of it and ive known em all since 85, they did alot of drugs!

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  24. Fred leave you stupid sob stories, poor me, feel bad for me, comments to the psychs, dr. lauras, AA meeting or someone else that wants to here your sorry life story! GET OVER IT! Cheri is gone...bye...bye, gone buddy! Sorry but its time somebody slapped you strait!

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