Monday, February 01, 2010

High tide crushing North Beacons

If you have time this morning come down to Beacons with a cup of
coffee and watch the bluff get destroyed by EL NINO.

21 comments:

  1. Just image if the the city didn't spend money to dump dirt on Leucadia beaches last summer.

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  2. Why don't we talk about our water rate increase? Apparently the city council wants to raise your rates about 40% over this year. If we all protest the increase they can't raise the rates.

    Look at he botton encinitas taxpayers website. www.encinitastaxpayers.org

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  3. that dumping really help with cliff erosion and keeps the cobblestones away...this picture must be from years ago before dirty dumping was allowed

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  4. its rinsing off all those pretty cobbles.

    Who wanted chicks lying on beach sand anyways wearing those terrible bikinis. Gross.

    Give me all those 60 year old long board geezers at Beacons with their speedos under their wetsuits.

    Now thats good stuff.

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  5. sand is sweet, but cobbles rock and roll...what surfer has ever whinged because there were cobbles on the beach? the attraction here is not miles of sandy beaches, and if that is what is marketed, it is a lie...the high tide covers most of the coastline, and will continue to do so regardless of all the dirt dumped

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  6. You do realize the vast majority of the California coastline looks just like this right now.

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  7. I hope they get those rocks off before the Swami's longboard contest.

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  8. With the damming of the rivers and armoring of the coastline, there is no supply of natural sand reaching the beach. Without replenishment, there will be little to no beach which is fine by me, but others may not appreciate it.

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  9. to truth, which of our sand supply rivers are dammed?

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  10. All of them from the railroads, I5 and Hwy101. The most open is the the Santa Margarita River rivermouth from Camp Pendleton.

    Check out the interesting link.

    http://interwork.sdsu.edu/fire/resources/MajorSanDiegoCountyRivers.htm

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  11. Woops... the last post was mine.

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  12. T,

    Be sure to recognize that I5, railroads and roads across our nearby waterways is thought to have a decimal dust impact on our beach sand budget.

    see http://tinyurl.com/ybeqpbp

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  13. By the way, I live blogged this with my iphone. Year 2010, the future is now!

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  14. dirty dumping for corporationsFebruary 02, 2010 9:12 AM

    What a crock, run-off from rivers supply our local beaches with sand. This is simply ludicrous. If we had to rely upon "rivers" in San Diego supplying beaches with sand, there would be no sand on the beaches. The sand comes from cliff erosion and tidal surges. Look at how "sandy" the beaches are where the cliff has given way. And, if "rivers" supply the sand for beaches, why doesn't N. California, Oregon and Washington have large sandy beaches that match the large free flowing rivers that empty into the ocean?

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  15. Luckily, the sand is already starting to come back.

    I like sandy beaches, and only like to visit the Northern California beach.

    It is all good here in Paradise.

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  16. Small south swell running right now. Already more sand than yesterday. Of course, next week's storm will wash that stuff away. It's the ebb and flow of nature.

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  17. Put the railroad and the highway on a bridge over San Dieguito Lagoon. Move the highway over next to the train tracks. That would open up the lagoon. Help flush it and allow any sand, if their is any, to wash out tour beaches. It will also make the whole area a nicer place.

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  18. 7:28

    don't be smart these are leucadians that only want to
    HATE HATE HATE and BAN BAN BAN

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  19. KC-

    Major rivers discharge over 90 percent of the coarse fluvial sediments [ie sand] that reaches the coast. Small groups of coastal streams discharge the remainder mostly through ravines in the coastal terraces. UCACOE considers San Juan Creek the largest contributor of foothill and mountain-source sediment. In the Oceanside Littoral Cell, San Juan Creek yields an estimated 38% of the total average annual discharge of 82,000yd3/yr, followed, in order, by the San Luis Rey River (22%), Santa Maragrita River (12%), and San Mateo Creek (9%)...

    Over 95% of the coarse sediment discharged by rivers reaches the coast north of Oceanside. Before control structures reduced flows in the major rivers the average annual coarse sediment discharge to the coast was about 134,000yr3/yr.

    San Luis Rey River (22%) sounds pretty large to me.... this coupled by the coast armor is the reason for no beach.

    Just look at the trails up by SanO. they have much nicer beaches that Encinitas.

    Facts are facts.

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  20. In the mid nineties when they dredged Batiquitos lagoon and opened it to tidal flow, they pumped out tons of sand every hour for weeks. That immensely added to our sandy beaches with sand that felt like silk. I think the tidal flow of Batiquitos still replenishes much of our sand. But like so many things, sand goes downhill, except for what you bring home on your feet. There will probably be a big push now for candidates to campaign for sand. If we do fund getting more sand, I'd like to see us get it from the lagoon again and not some place across the planet that keeps public ashtrays full.

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  21. I agree with Fred.... dredge the lagoons where the sand is silk and free. The sand will finally reach its end destination on the beach.

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